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andybeel:

Reblogged from Kenneth Wajda. This is a good explanation of how I feel about digital capture its too everything… Thanks Kenneth

Originally posted on 6x6 Portraits | Kenneth Wajda:

Here’s an interesting perspective about film vs digital imaging. Film looks like past tense, and digital looks like present tense. Here’s an example that everyone will instantly understand. If I switch on the TV and the movie The Natural or Angels In the Outfield, or Bull Durham or any other baseball movie is on, in a scene of game action, no one will see the players and think they are watching the sports highlights. They can tell it looks like a movie, and not video from today’s MLB broadcast of your team, whatever city you’re in. It looks like a movie, like it was recorded and saved some time ago. Past tense.

George and Co.Digital imaging looks like present tense, like surveillance footage, really. Just what you shot is exactly what you got.

Film has a dreamy, slightly soft quality, that looks like a moment stored, saved from the past. That’s…

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A photographers heart

_MG_8308-EditIf you are a musician first base is playing all the right notes in the right order. Second base is playing all the right notes in the right order and putting a personal interpretation on the piece.

Camera operators get correct exposure and focus and record the scene.

Photographers record the scene with an personal interpretation that’s individual to them. Interpretation reveals perceived significance and the heart and soul of the photographer.

A big hello to all the new followers of my blog this week.

(c) Andy Beel FRPS 2014

http://www.andybeelfrps.co.uk

_MG_7076A free top tip to increase the perception of perspective or depth in a picture.

A wide-angle lens in the portrait aspect ratio tilted downwards will always increase the sense of depth in a picture.

If that is combined with a converging lines the effect will be also be improved.

Back lighting will also help.

This picture was taken on a 24mm wide-angle lens.

If I was going to print this picture I would choose a paper from my sponsors called Fotospeed Platinum Etching because it has a way of making pictures look three dimensional. This paper makes you think you can walk straight in to the picture.

see www.fotospeed.com

A big hello to all the new followers of my blog this week.

(c) Andy Beel FRPS 2014

http://www.andybeelfrps.co.uk

_MG_6817The digital age of photography means that there is a proliferation of frames taken suggests that its easy to forget what you have done and not take the picture to it’s rightful conclusion.

In my case taken to conclusion might mean that a picture ends up here on my blog, on my website, as an A3 sized print or an A2 sized print if the picture is exceptional.

To help me bring order to the editing process I use various smart collections in the Lightroom Library. A smart collection automatically brings together in one place all the pictures that are tagged in a particular way. Each photographer will require different criteria for output. The example below is just what I use for me.

The process is based on logic unfortunately as are all things to do with computers!!

Firstly you will need to create a Collection Set – this is just a container to hold a series of smart collections.

Once you have a collection set then you can add individual smart collections to it. The idea here is to edit or refine the numbers of pictures. I have 41,488 pictures in my Library as of today’s date. So as I create smart collections hopefully I am only working with the images that might go somewhere.

By using combinations of flags, stars and colour labels a very wide range of criteria can be selected. When you add in all the options in the Smart collection drop down menus then the world is your lobster!

This post is not intended to be a click by click guide how to create custom collections – see the link to the Adobe video below.

In my collection set I have:

Smart Collection No 1 only looks for any picture that is Flagged.

Smart Collection No 2 only looks for any picture that is Flagged and has a one star rating – it’s colour processing is finished.

Smart Collection No  3 only looks for any picture that is Flagged and has a two star rating – it’s B&W processing processing is finished.

Smart Collection No 4 only looks for any picture that is Flagged and has a three star rating – it’s Lith processing is finished.

Smart Collection No 5 only looks for any picture that is Flagged and has a four star rating – it’s Infra-red processing is finished.

Smart Collection No 6 only looks for any picture that is Flagged and has a red label – it’s been used on my blog .

Smart Collection No 7 only looks for any picture that is Flagged and has a Yellow label – it’s been used on my website.

Smart Collection No 8 only looks for any picture that is Flagged and has a Green label – it’s been printed for a talk.

Smart Collection No 9 only looks for any picture that is Flagged and has a Blue label – it’s been used in an article.

See this video by Julieanne Kost from Adobe that explains things in her usual straight forward way.

http://tv.adobe.com/watch/adobe-evangelists-julieanne-kost/lightroom-5-creating-custom-collections-of-images/

Once you get the principal you can use the same logic to refine pictures say for a distinctions application.

It also follows that I can find any combination of criteria so if I want to find what files have been processed as say Lith and then printed – all I need to search for is a flagged 3 star picture with a Green Label. It’s so simple even I understand it.

A big hello to all the new followers of my blog this week.

(c) Andy Beel FRPS 2014

http://www.andybeelfrps.co.uk

The art of repetition

_MG_0112-EditClick on the picture, Hit F11 and then Cont + scroll your mouse wheel so the picture fills the monitor.

Getting on for nearly a year ago I did a post called “Allowing perception to mature” that was very well received, see it at andybeelfrps.wordpress.com/2013/10/27/allowing-perception-to-mature/

Here is another example of forgetting an interesting picture taken in an art gallery in The Hague last autumn.

The point about leaving pictures for a while (months or years) to mature before they are edited and processed helps you see them for what they really are good, bad or indifferent.

I was working on pictures I took yesterday evening well in to last night and felt by midnight that I could not see the wood for the trees because I was too close to the capture. Perception has not had time to mature. I will come back to them in a few months time and have a much better idea of the good, bad and indifferent amongst the 150 shots.

This post was called “The art of repetition” because of the repeated picture frames receding out of focus. They also repeat the idea of the main motif. Again there is a strong element of negative space in the picture – a repeating theme of mine.

As my photographic career has progressed more and more I take pictures “about” something not “of” the subject matter. I am photographer not a mobile camera operator!

A big hello to all the new followers of my blog this week.

(c) Andy Beel FRPS 2014

http://www.andybeelfrps.co.uk

Old audio

_MG_7157-2Vinyl  the audio technology before – digital, DVD, Mini-disk, CD and cassette tape.

Did you buy CD’s of the same albums you had on Vinyl? I certainly did.

Just a close-up with a 150mm Macro lens at f2.8. For those of you who wonder, is anywhere in this picture sharp – yes at a reasonable size you can see the machining marks on the record spindle.

For me in this picture there is a good balance of suggestion and definition. As a preference I enjoy making pictures that hint at something and raise questions in the viewers mind rather than giving a definite statement.

“To suggest is to create, to define is to destroy” by Stephane Mallarme is a quote I have used many times on my blog.

A big hello to all the new followers of my blog this week.

(c) Andy Beel FRPS 2014

http://www.andybeelfrps.co.uk

Netham Park enhancement

_MG_6996Wild flowers in their environment, high rise flats in the background.

Shallow depth of field at f2.8 to suggest shapes and let the viewer decide what the shapes are.

Question

Has anybody experience of getting raw files out of Aperture 3 and import them in to Lightroom 5? When trying to import these files directly in to Lr 5 the files are greyed out in the Mac finder??

A big hello to all the new followers of my blog this week.

(c) Andy Beel FRPS 2014

http://www.andybeelfrps.co.uk

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